A Look at Stonehenge: Spirit and Science of Place

Photo by Samuel Wölfl on Pexels.com

Maybe one day I’ll get to visit Stonehenge, I’ve always wanted to ever since getting into books about mysterious phenomenon when I was a kid – you know those large In Serach of knockoff coffee table books from the 80’s and 90’s full of articles on Bigfoot, aliens, The Bermuda Triangle, and of course Stonehenge. I lived for stuff like that – of course these books were largely silly on how they talked about the popular Neolithic stone circle (It’s obviously aliens Ya’ll!) For right now, though, going to Stonehenge is not really in the cards – So I was VERY excited to do the next best thing this summer in Kansas City – a new traveling museum exhibition full of artifacts from the chalky hills of The Salisbury Plain.

This exhibit was held at a large train station / exhibition hall in Downtown Kansas City called Union Station – at any given time, about 2-3 times a year, they host traveling exhibits such as Pompeii, Titanic, or King Tut that draw large crowds. I actually brought members of the previous Kindred I was a member of in as a group at a discounted price, this was awesome, as paying basically half-price made everyone very happy.

‘Mysterious’, ‘awe-inspiring’, ‘magical’, ‘sacred’ and ‘eternal’ are some of the words used to describe Stonehenge. Scholars and visitors alike have puzzled over this unique prehistoric monument for centuries. After years of excavation and thanks to ground-breaking advances in science and archaeology we are closer than ever to understanding Stonehenge.

Stonehenge: Spirit and Science of Place looks to over 400 original artifacts and the latest cutting-edge scientific research to answer questions about this iconic, mysterious World Heritage Site. The exhibition tracks the development of Stonehenge as a special place in the landscape, and explains the origins of the monument while illuminating the lives of the people behind it.

Visitors will leave the exhibition with new revelations into what Stonehenge meant to the people who built it … and what it means to the world today.

The exhibition is a cooperation with the UCL Institute of Archaeology, Wiltshire Museum, the Salisbury Museum, English Heritage and The National Trust and was curated by Prof. Mike Parker Pearson and Dr. Beatrijs de Groot from the UCL, London.

– From the exhibit’s webpage

Upon Entering the exhibition area, visitors were greeted with a brief introduction video laying out what we were about to see. Large “stone columns” lifted up and we were ushered into the huge multimedia exhibit hall consisting of videos from the contributing scientists that curated the exhibit, artifacts including rocks and bone fragments (just to mention a few), and items such as mannequins that showed what the people that built Stonehenge could have looked like. One particular highlight of mine was a film in which an actress portrayed one of the builders discussing her reasons for helping, and spiritual significance she felt in the process. This video was VERY powerful, and really set the tone of the exhibit – a look at the people behind Stonehenge Vs The stones themselves.

It was interesting to note that the main theory presented by the curators was that the Stones were a place of worship, and aided with ancestor worship as well as being a calendar and burial ground. I was surprised that this was seen as a “new take” on what the stones were, and makes me want to really read some other scholarship on the site to see what the consensus generally is.

Here are some photos of the exhibit:

Perhaps, my only quibble with the exhibit was that the possible spiritual significance of the site was not elaborated much on, which was one of the things I was fairly interested to see their take on. Granted, with no records left behind, anything is pure speculation. I’m just glad they didn’t talk about aliens the whole time!

Museum Partner has a number of other traveling exhibitions that might be of interest to fellow Heathens – 3 of which are Viking related and another Celtic. Let us all hope / Pray that one of them come to Kansas City (for me because I’m selfish!) or a place you live near!

REVIEW: Heilung: Futha (2019)

Usually, when people discuss ways that they were brought into paganism, one usually hears stories about being wronged by another group or an experience that brought them in line with the old ways – for me, the path was slightly different. Ever since high school, I have been obsessed with medieval style folk music and folk metal – to such a degree that I sometimes feel as if I’m having a church experience at concerts from time to time. You know, that blissful euphoric feeling that usually is seen as “being endowed with the Holy Spirit” when discussing Christianity? That’s me if I hear bagpipes and see some dudes wearing tunics on stage. For somebody raised Catholic, then being vaguely Gnostic for a number of years as a reaction to becoming anti-Catholic, I realized that my soul was being drawn to the ways of my ancestors through music – and thankfully, in 2019 I have never felt so full as this is a banner year for Pagan folk bands!

There is no other musician or groups of musicians in 2019 that have imparted this feeling on me more than an experimental folk project called Heilung or “healing” in German. I once stumbled on a live performance of theirs that took place at a festival called Castlefest in 2017, the concert itself is both a work of art, and a classic performance that ranks, with me personally, as something as profound as Queen at Live Aid. The Live album itself is also very impressive as a result.

It would seem that others agree, as many of their Youtube videos have garnered millions of views, and they have been played on Sirius XM Liquid Metal, a channel that, as the name would imply, plays metal music. While there is some overlap between the listeners, Heilung have absolutely ZERO metal to their sound (minus throat singing perhaps), so it’s a testament to their unique nature that they are jumping into territory most folk bands never tread.

If not familiar with these guys, Heilung is comprised of members from various countries like Denmark, Norway and Germany, and describe their music as “amplified history from early medieval northern Europe”. Their music is based on texts and artifacts of the Iron Age and the early Viking Age specifically. In the broadest sense, their general “gimmick” for lack of a better term, is that they are shamans using their music, and stage show as rituals to give zeal to warriors or channel spirits depending on the song. The band uses animal skin drums, osteomancy (human and animal bones) and various rattles, whistles, and other implements, some antiques themselves. 

“With the epic new album Futha, the enigmatic HEILUNG return with their signature Amplified History. A counterbalance to their rugged debut Ofnir, Futha reveals a more melodic and beautiful side of the mysterious ensemble. Their primeval musique concrete blends ancient Germanic tongues, lush geophonic recordings (crackling fires, breaking ice), and the percussive thunder of archaic weaponry (swords, shields, arrows) into a reverential ceremonial experience. HEILUNG are in a class all their own, and Futha is an entrancing masterstroke of profound worldly music.”

Heilung’s Bandcamp

In 2019, the band has released their second studio album, called Futha  – These are follow-ups to Ofnir (2015) (self-released, reissued 2018 on Season of Mist) and Lifa (2017) (Season of Mist) the previously mentioned livee album. On the meaning of the album title, HEILUNG explains:



“The majority of full rune set inscriptions start with ‘Futha,’ and is known to us as the first four letters in all runic alphabets. It is considered that our forefathers saw magic potential in engraving the full rune line, but there is also great significance in the beginnings. Science has no key for the meaning of only engraving the first couple of letters yet, but there is, of course, a surplus of theories. One of the theories we found inspiration in, is that ‘Futha’ holds the meaning of fertility and female gender. As ‘Ofnir’ focused on war and masculine notions, the great healing power of female wild strength is evoked in Futha. Those who have been present at a birth or have seen lionesses hunting know the spirit, and we welcome and embrace it in the sounds that were born during the creation of ‘Futha.’”

via Overdrive Mag

1. Galgaldr 10:21    

2. Norupo 04:17      

3. Othan 10:18         

4. Traust 09:48        

5. Vapnatak 04:02   

6. Svanrand 03:36  

7. Elivagar 08:44     

8. Elddansurin 08:05          

9. Hamrer Hippyer 14:16

Much like with Ofnir, the music from Futha is still folk music, but is almost in more of a post-industrial, neo-folk style – meaning that there is a lot of use of electronic instruments and synthesizers rather than the myriad of bones and other instruments a large touring band can provide as heard on Lifa. This might be a turn of for some, as I was made well aware that many in my friends circle thought that Lifa was, in fact, their first album and had no idea that the sound on it was slightly different than the studio album. 

Stand-out tracks are Norupo and Traust which are coincidentally the two singles that have been released as of today. I also enjoyed some of the small interludes quite a bit that pepper the release, usually some type of chanting and and growling that could definitely be envisioned to be coming from a seers tent thousands of years ago. These choices are not to say that the rest of the album is bad, perhaps its 100% the opposite. It’s just that this is more of an “album album” better experienced as a whole rather than in chunks. Those two tracks are just the two that can more easily be tossed onto an iPod and called up at will.

I would say that I like Futha Better than Ofnir as a whole, but absolutely cannot wait for a presumptive live album to come from these tracks. They haven’t announced anything, but I hope they repeat the trend from the last cycle. I also hope that their announced US tour comes somewhere near me, as I would absolutely go insane given the chance to see them in person.

In closing, definitely check this album out if you like Heilung, and do yourself a favor and look at their YouTube page for some live renditions of the songs, you will NOT be disappointed.

REVIEW – The Hanged God: Óðinn Grímnir by Shani Oates

Cover

Who would have thought that a small Canadian occult book publisher would publish perhaps one of the most interesting books on Ancient Scandinavian religion and customs this year? This is exactly what has happened with Anathema Publishing’s newest book – The Hanged God: Óðinn Grímnir by Shani Oates. Oates is perhaps best known for her work promoting a strand of Witchcraft dubbed Cochrane’s Craft, which is also known as Cochranianism. This is a strand of traditional witchcraft founded in 1951 by the English witch Robert Cochrane, to which Oates is one of the leading members of at this moment. Anathema has previously published a few of her books on various subjects including The Devil’s Supper and Crafting the Arte of Tradition, both of which were solid reads. Oates does well to write her books in a solid scholarly way, staying clear of overt editorialization in favor of looking into topics such as anthropology and history of a given subject.

The theme of the book is an exploration of one particular passage of a large poetic codex called the Hávamál (sayings of the high one) particularly stanzas 138-141. This series of interconnected poems are set up in such a way as to be the spoken word of Óðinn himself, with this one particular section being one of the more puzzling parts to come to terms with for many scholars.

138 I know I hung on that windy tree Nine whole days and nights, Stabbed with a spear, offered to Óðinn, Myself to mine own self given, High on that tree which none hath heard From what roots it rises to heaven.   140 Nine mighty songs I learned from the great son of Bale-Thorn, Bestla’s sire; I drank a measure of the wondrous mead, With the soul stirrers drops I was showered
139 None refreshed me ever with food or drink, I peered right down in the deep, Crying aloud [screaming] I lifted the runes, Then back I fell from thence.   141 Ere long I bare fruit, and throve full well, I grew and waxed in wisdom; Word following word, I found me words, Dead following Dead, I wrought deeds.  

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For a long time, many people have looked at the self-described self-immolation of Óðinn as a way for the writers of such literature to bring Óðinn into the same standing as the burgeoning Christianity by concocting a similar self-sacrifice as that of the Christian Messiah, Jesus Christ. The problem is, as Oates points out, there appears to be a complete missing meaning to these passages that is simply that first topic being – why did Óðinn hang himself? It’s not a sacrifice for his people like Jesus, so why waste the energy? If one looks at things such as similar traditions to reconstruct what ancient Scandinavian rituals might have been like before many traditions were wiped away by missionaries, an entirely different view of this passage comes to light.

Oates discusses multiple ancient cultures near and within Scandinavia showing that many, if not all of them had a similar idea – sacrificial hanging was VERY important. She talks a lot about the Ancient rituals at a site called Gamla Uppasala in Sweden, and how the tradition of the hanging tree was supposedly laid out. I say “supposedly”, because the only surviving descriptions of this are from Christian chroniclers, which are no doubt over-exaggerating this to show “how cruel these barbaric heathens are”.

“A general festival for all the provinces of Sweden is customarily held at Uppsala every nine years. Participation in this festival is required of everyone. Kings and their subjects, collectively and individually, send their gifts to Uppsala; – and – a thing more cruel than any punishment – those who have already adopted Christianity buy themselves off from these ceremonies. The sacrifice is as follows; of every kind of male creature, nine victims are offered. By the blood of these creatures it is the custom to appease the gods. Their bodies, moreover, are hanged in a grove which is adjacent to the temple. This grove is so sacred to the people that the separate trees in it are believed to be holy because of the death or putrefaction of the sacrificial victims. There even dogs and horses hang beside human beings. (A certain Christian told me that he had seen seventy-two of their bodies hanging up together.) The incantations, however, which are usually sung in the performance of a libation of this kind are numerous and disgraceful, and it is better not to speak of them. “

An example of interior art

She comes to a conclusion that Óðinn’s ritual suicide was that – a ritual – a way for him to have visions as many ancient shamans would do, or at the very least these were instructions for others to have similar experiences to gain true wisdom. Perhaps, this was in some way something akin to a Native American vision quest that Óðinn had performed – hanging in a tree for nine days without food and water, hallucinating towards the end. And when done, he found one of the most important things – the runes themselves!

 The Hanged God: Óðinn Grímnir is a very interesting book and solid read if you don’t mind something a bit scholarly (full of footnotes and the like). I’m VERY glad tis book did not follow a similar path to similar books I’ve read that seek to overturn long-held beliefs of various religions. For instance, I once read a book called The Sacred Mushroom and The Cross: A study of the nature and origins of Christianity within the fertility cults of the ancient Near East by John M. Allegro, where he postulated that the entirety of Christianity was once based on the cultivation and worship of red and white mushrooms for psychotropic reasons. While this book was interesting “food for thought” of the sort you hear on something like the Joe Rogan Experience Podcast, it was not scholarly, and suffered by being a huge list of various instances of confirmation bias.

Thankfully, Oates avoids this by giving tons of evidence with citations for her assertations, and yes some of it is speculation, but it never veers past something that you could see making sense. I’m sure some hardened historians would balk at many of the ideas presented in the book, but that’s the entire point honestly. The book sets out to overturn what they’ve been sitting on for decades.

Anathema is usually a company that releases small print run hardback editions on various esoteric topics, here they are dipping their toe into a paperback line dubbed the Octavo series. While having a paperback has pros and cons of course. I like collecting hardcover books, so I sort of wish this book was available in both formats as I would have likely spent a bit more to get a hardcover. One of the pros here is obviously the cost – this book is CONSIDERABLY cheaper than their other books, even with the insane shipping price it takes to get this over from the far reaches of Canada. The book itself is absolutely gorgeous, covered in luxurious golden foil embossing and striking art pieces on the interiors. Supposedly, Anathema is trying to establish overseas retailers such is an occult book store called Miskatonic books as an American seller, so my issue with the shipping prices might be neutralized soon.

All-in-all this is (so far) one of the better speculative books on this subject I’ve ever read and it is VERY thought provoking. Do I assume everything stated in the book is absolute truth? No. In fact, I thought the ultimate conclusion was sort of too vague too completely wrap everything up. But it’s just as plausible as the historical accounts seeped in Christian afterthought and the need to everything to fit into a modern worldview. Since I now own three books by Oates from Anathema, I honestly should try to check some of her self-published stuff out. While I do not practice witchcraft, the books should be, at least, an interesting read. 

Shani Oates

For more information, go to:

Anathema Publishing

or

Miskaatonic Books

MSRP: $33.00